Certified Public Accountants & Financial Advisors

Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Payroll tax wtihholding rates and other information effective January 1, 2022 is provided in detail.


President Biden, on August 16, 2022, signed the Inflation Reduction Act ( P.L. 117-169) into law following its passage along party lines in both chambers of Congress.


President Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act into law after it received bipartisan support in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.


Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is seeking a detailed plan from the Internal Revenue Service on how it plans to spend to the $80 billion in additional funds that the agency received as part of the Inflation Reduction Act that was signed by President Biden on August 16, 2022.


National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins has taken an "unusual step" to appeal an Internal Revenue Service Deputy Commissioners’ decision directly to Commissioner Charles Rettig for reconsideration regarding the use of scanning technology for paper tax returns.


The IRS and the Security Summit partners have warned tax professionals to beware of evolving identity theft scams perpetrated through phishing emails and SMS-text that are designed to trick practitioners into opening embedded links or attachments that infect their computer systems with the potential to steal personal and client information such as passwords, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, or social security numbers.


The IRS has extended the deadlines for amending a retirement plan or individual retirement arrangement (IRA) to reflect certain provisions of Division O of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, P. L. 116-94, known as the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE Act), and Section 104 of Division M of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, known as the Bipartisan American Miners Act of 2019 (Miners Act). In addition, the IRS has extended the deadline for amending a retirement plan to reflect Section 2203 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), P. L. 116-136.The extended amendment deadline for (1) a qualified retirement plan or Code Sec. 403(b) plan (including an applicable collectively bargained plan) that is not a governmental plan or (2) an IRA is December 31, 2025.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations eliminating the signature requirement for making a Code Sec. 754 election (section 754 election). The regulations finalize 2017 proposed regulations ( REG-116256-17), on which taxpayers were entitled to rely.


The American Institute of CPAs highlighted several challenges that tax practitioners are experiencing with the use of the Internal Revenue Service’s Practitioner Priority Service (PPS) line.


The American Institute of CPAs offered up suggestions to Congress, focused on the trust and estate proposals found within the fiscal year 2023 revenue proposal, as the legislative branch considers the White House Budget request.


The IRS reminded taxpayers that their website (www.irs.gov) provides millions of visitors with the answers they need to fit their busy summer schedules.


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act modifies Section 529 qualified tuition plans to allow the plans to distribute up to $10,000 in tuition expenses incurred during the tax year for designated beneficiaries enrolled at a public, private, or religious elementary or secondary school. Section 529 plans used to only be allowed for college tuition, up to full tuition amounts. That provision for college tuition remains the same.


The IRS expects to receive more than 150 million individual income tax returns this year and issue billions of dollars in refunds. That huge pool of refunds drives scam artists and criminals to steal taxpayer identities and claim fraudulent refunds. The IRS has many protections in place to discover false returns and refund claims, but taxpayers still need to be proactive.


An employer must withhold income taxes from compensation paid to common-law employees (but not from compensation paid to independent contractors). The amount withheld from an employee's wages is determined in part by the number of withholding exemptions and allowances the employee claims. Note that although the Tax Code and regulations distinguish between withholding exemptions and withholding allowances, the terms are interchangeable. The amount of reduction attributable to one withholding allowance is the same as that attributable to one withholding exemption. Form W-4 and most informal IRS publications refer to both as withholding allowances, probably to avoid confusion with the complete exemption from withholding for employees with no tax liability.


Estimated tax is used to pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding or if not enough tax is being withheld from a person's salary, pension or other income. Income not subject to withholding can include dividends, capital gains, prizes, awards, interest, self-employment income, and alimony, among other income items. Generally, individuals who do not pay at least 90 percent of their tax through withholding must estimate their income tax liability and make equal quarterly payments of the "required annual payment" liability during the year.


The tax rules surrounding the dependency exemption deduction on a federal income tax return can be complicated, with many requirements involving who qualifies for the deduction and who qualifies to take the deduction. The deduction can be a very beneficial tax break for taxpayers who qualify to claim dependent children or other qualifying dependent family members on their return. Therefore, it is important to understand the nuances of claiming dependents on your tax return, as the April 18 tax filing deadline is just around the corner.